DAYS AWAY FROM ITALY

IL DIZIONARIO

THE DICTIONARY

Since the Italian language is essential to understanding Italian culture, I will use – and explain – Italian words frequently.

For ready reference, this dizionario contains all Italian words and phrases used on STARVING FOR ITALY.

These are short and informal definitions. I recommend the Collins Dictionary for fuller explanations.

The CATEGORIES in STARVING FOR ITALY

CIN-CIN

Cin-Cin (pronounced “chin-chin”) is an informal toast used by Italians, especially with aperitiviPosts in the Cin-Cin category focus on food and drink.

CULTURA

Culture, broadly defined.  Posts in the Cultura category focus on the ways Italian culture and language affect how Italians act and how Italy works (in my experience).

ECCOMI

Eccomi (pronounced “echo-me”) means Here I Am!  Posts in the Eccomi category describe my personal journey with Italy. They also form the origin story of this blog. Start reading here.

LETTERARIO

Literary.  Posts in the Letterario category focus on books and authors.

VIAGGIARE

To travel.  Posts in the Viaggiare category focus on trips to a particular place in Italy.

ITALIAN WORDS AND PHRASES in STARVING FOR ITALY

ALLA PROSSIMA VOLTA

Until next time, often used as a salutation when leaving.

APERITIVI

Aperitifs, or the drinks before a meal.

BELLA FIGURA

To fare bella figura means to present oneself well – in appearance, in manners, in performance. You can also say someone is a figurone. This contrasts with brutta figura. See the post La Bella Figura  for further discussion.

BRUTTA FIGURA

To fare brutta figura means to engage in ugly or undesirable behavior. You can also say someone is a figuraccia. This contrasts with bella figura. See the post La Bella Figura for further discussion.

FESSO

To be fesso means to be a stickler for the rules, in contrast with being furbo. See the post Becoming A. S. Furbetta for further discussion.

FURBO, FARE FURBO

To be furbo means to be clever enough to skirt the rules and get away with it.  The post Becoming A. S. Furbetta describes how being furbo forms part of the Italian culture.

GIUSTO?

Right?

LOGGIONE

The loggione is the upper gallery, the highest seating in an opera house or theater. Those who occupy these seats are the loggionisti. See the post La Scala for the First Time for the story of the loggione of La Scala.

MI DISPIACE

I’m sorry

MI RACCOMANDO!

I recommend it, emphatically.  As in, I REALLY MEAN IT!  (Depending on context, can also mean “Behave!” “Follow the rules!” “I’m warning you!”)

ONOMASTICO

The name day of a saint. Celebrated in Italy as a “second birthday” on the Saint Day of the saint you were named after.  See the post TRACKING DOWN SAN LORENZO for further discussion.

NON VEDO L’ORA!

I can’t wait, emphatically.  As in, I’m dying for…

PALCO,              PALCHI (pl.)

The palchi are the boxes, usually separated, usually plush, in an opera house or theater. The box-holder or occupant of a palco is called a palchettista. See the post La Scala for the First Time for the history of the palchi of La Scala.

PANINO

A sandwich.

PORTICO

A porch or covered walk, with a roof supported by columns, often at the entrance or across the front of a building; colonnade.

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